Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health


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Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Mar 15, DC rated it really liked it. Laid out very well and plainly - and especially topical for me at the moment in week 31 of pregnancy.

Really I think the book deserves an A, but I'm withholding that grade in favor of a B because I don't think it's quite as accessible to a non-specialist audience as the book was hoping to be. I'd definitely, definitely use it for a class or a book group, though! Aug 27, Jennifer rated it liked it. This is how engrained a male perspective has been in our western medical history. Jun 27, Rebecca rated it really liked it. Excellent read. Everyone should read this book, but of course women especially.

Mar 30, Kristin rated it really liked it Shelves: gender-studies , health-and-diet , science , non-fiction. The dominant metaphor in medicine these days is that the body is a machine. When it breaks, you look at the blueprints, or go to someone who has the blueprints a doctor and try to fix it.

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A useful metaphor to an extent, but when you consider the body as an evolved form that has been shaped by forces favoring reproduction for millions of years, it is more helpful to look at the body as a bundle of compromises. Compromises that have favored reproduction that's how natural selection works , mayb The dominant metaphor in medicine these days is that the body is a machine.

Compromises that have favored reproduction that's how natural selection works , maybe even at the cost of long-term health and longevity. An evolutionary approach to health addresses the mismatch between our evolved bodies and our physical lifestyles. Because cultural evolution has outpaced biological evolution think of game-changers like agriculture, birth control, modern medicine, etc.

This well-researched book covers all the major phases in a woman's life with regard to her one evolved purpose: reproduction. This is not to argue that reproduction in the most important function of a woman's identity, but that her health cannot be understood outside of the way her body has evolved. This book also inadvertently helped me understand the evolutionary approach to the paleo diet as well though the anthropologist author does not address this in the book.

The idea is not so much to mimic paleolithic living as it is to recognize that we are already living in paleolithic bodies! The argument is not one of complete biological determism of which I am a staunch opponent because it's very premise is that we live in a unique environment created by culture, and this is what creates a challenge for our health.

Adding Trevathan's view of the body as a bundle of compromises shaped for reproduction is an often-missing piece to the dietary puzzle, and I have much more exploring to do! Jan 24, Marjorie Elwood rated it liked it Shelves: science. Really a 2. Follow this author. New articles by this author. New citations to this author. New articles related to this author's research. Email address for updates. My profile My library Metrics Alerts. Sign in. Get my own profile Cited by View all All Since Citations h-index 26 20 iindex 39 Verified email at nmsu.

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Articles Cited by Co-authors. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews 4 5 , , A second possibility is that expanding the pelvis beyond its current dimensions would diminish some unexamined, nonenergetic aspect of locomotor performance, such as speed or stability.

Wider pelves may also increase the risk of injury, either through increasing the likelihood of pelvic prolapse 47 or by increasing mediolateral stresses on the knees and ankles These scenarios would suggest an OD-like mechanism acting on pelvic morphology secondarily to the metabolic limits on neonatal body and brain size. A third possibility is that the present level of difficulty and danger in childbirth is a relatively recent phenomenon brought on by an increase in maternal energy consumption In this scenario, recent changes in the diet have increased energy availability during gestation, leading to larger neonates, but selection has not had sufficient time or reason to accommodate the female pelvis to this recent dietary change.

Finally, a fourth possibility, originally proposed by Portmann 5 , is that the timing of human birth and degree of neonatal brain development optimizes cognitive and motor neuronal development Additional work is needed to determine whether these factors, or others, might help to explain the difficulty of birth in modern human populations. Although the development of neural circuitry, pelvic size, fetal growth rates, and other factors may be involved in the evolution of gestation length, the evidence we present here supports an energetic explanation, based on mammalian physiological constraints, for the timing of human birth.

Under the EGG hypothesis, if the human reproductive system poses a dilemma between competing needs, then fetal energy needs and maternal energy supply are the competitors, rather than encephalization and bipedalism. Thus, human neonatal altriciality is better described as prolongation of fetal brain maturation and growth irrespective of parturition 5. With a better understanding of the energetic constraints on gestation and fetal growth and a stronger grasp of all of the factors that determine human birth timing, there is greater potential to explain the evolution of the extended human childhood and to understand its biological, behavioral, and cultural consequences.

diosubsgastkapa.gq: Wenda R. Trevathan PhD - Biological Sciences / Science, Nature & Math: Books

We thank A. Buchanan, K. Clancy, S. DeWitte, B. Frazier, N. Jablonski, J.

Kurland, E. Quillen, J. Rutherford, P. Shipman, K. Stacey, A. Walker, K. Weiss, and anonymous reviewers. Trinkaus, G.

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Conroy, C. Hildebolt, K. Smith, D. Raichlen, C. Rolian, T. Erez, G. Foster, S. Love, C. Williams, S. Huo, M.


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    Ancient Bodies Modern Lives How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health

    This article contains supporting information online at www. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address. Skip to main content. Metabolic hypothesis for human altriciality Holly M. Dunsworth , Anna G. Warrener , Terrence Deacon , Peter T.

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    Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health
    Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health
    Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health
    Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health
    Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Womens Health

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